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The book examines the themes of community governance, order maintenance and legal pluralism in the context of refugee camps on the Thailand-Burma border

Cover image: Governing Refugees: Justice, Order and Legal Pluralism Routledge
Cover image: Governing Refugees: Justice, Order and Legal Pluralism

Dr McConnachie's new book, Governing Refugees: Justice, Order and Legal Pluralism (Routledge, 2014), has received a number of glowing reviews. Jack Dunford MBE, Executive Director, The Border Consortium 1984 to 2013, praises McConnachie's 'insightful research' that 'challenges common perceptions of refugees as powerless victims and of refugee camps as dangerous places lacking normal social structures.' Kieran McEvoy, Professor of Law and Transitional Justice, Queens University Belfast, calls the book 'the real deal' in interdisciplinary research, adding that McConnachie 'moves effortlessly from law, criminology, through to anthropology with stops along the way in refugee studies, development and human rights.' Professor Jonathan Simon, University of California Berkeley, says, 'Kirsten McConnachie has given us a stunning empirical account of how refugees are governed.'

From the publishers:

Refugee camps are imbued in the public imagination with assumptions of anarchy, danger and refugee passivity. Governing Refugees: Justice, Order and Legal Pluralism marshals empirical data and ethnographic detail to challenge such assumptions, arguing that refugee camps should be recognised as spaces where social capital can not only survive, but thrive.

This book examines themes of community governance, order maintenance and legal pluralism in the context of refugee camps on the Thailand-Burma border. The nature of a refugee situation is such that multiple actors take a role in camp management, creating a complex governance environment which has a significant impact on the lives of refugees. This situation also speaks to deeply important questions of legal and political scholarship, including the production of order beyond the state, justice as a contested site, and the influence of transnational human rights discourses on local justice practice.

The book presents valuable new research into the subject of refugee camps as well as an original critical analysis. The interdisciplinary nature of McConnachie’s assessment means Governing Refugees will appeal across the fields of law, anthropology and criminology, as well as to those whose work directly relates to Refugee Studies.

How to purchase

The book is available in hardback and ebook formats.

Order online from Routledge >>

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