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  • Displacement, transitional justice and reconciliation: assumptions, challenges and lessons

    20 November 2013

    This RSC Policy Briefing explores the links between reconciliation, forced migration and transitional justice, bringing into focus the ways in which displaced persons figure in transitional justice processes, and the potential implications of this involvement for reconciliation. The paper addresses the interlinked conceptual and practical challenges associated with trying to advance reconciliation in post-conflict societies affected by large-scale displacement, and highlights some of the ways in which policymakers and practitioners have sought to support reconciliation between displaced populations and other actors. It analyses some of the assumptions that have characterised these efforts, and suggests ways in which the challenges surrounding the interface of displacement, transitional justice and reconciliation may be more effectively navigated.

  • Stabilising the Congo

    20 November 2013

    This RSC Policy Briefing Paper considers the ‘stabilisation approach’ adopted by both the international community and national government to address the continued insecurity in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Considering stabilisation also offers a way of conceptualising and engaging with the root causes of displacement. Political implications of the stabilisation agenda are brought into sharper relief by focusing on a single question: stabilisation by whom and for whom? Rather than continuing to support the State unconditionally, the brief calls on international actors to strengthen and exercise their combined leverage in critical priority areas that together form a comprehensive ‘road map’ to long-term peace and stability following the elections.

  • Stabilising the Congo (French)

    20 November 2013

    This RSC Policy Briefing Paper considers the ‘stabilisation approach’ adopted by both the international community and national government to address the continued insecurity in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Considering stabilisation also offers a way of conceptualising and engaging with the root causes of displacement. Political implications of the stabilisation agenda are brought into sharper relief by focusing on a single question: stabilisation by whom and for whom? Rather than continuing to support the State unconditionally, the brief calls on international actors to strengthen and exercise their combined leverage in critical priority areas that together form a comprehensive ‘road map’ to long-term peace and stability following the elections.

  • Protracted Sahrawi displacement: challenges and opportunities beyond encampment

    20 November 2013

    This RSC Policy Briefing analyses the challenges and opportunities – after 35 years of protracted displacement and encampment – for the Sahrawi refugees, their political representatives and international actors. The paper challenges assumptions and representations of conditions and dynamics in the camps. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh also calls for a careful analysis of the diverse alternative solutions to encampment in Algeria that have been adopted or proposed and of the relevant protection concerns which may arise.

  • Protracted Sahrawi displacement: challenges and opportunities beyond encampment (Arabic)

    20 November 2013

    This RSC Policy Briefing analyses the challenges and opportunities – after 35 years of protracted displacement and encampment – for the Sahrawi refugees, their political representatives and international actors. The paper challenges assumptions and representations of conditions and dynamics in the camps. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh also calls for a careful analysis of the diverse alternative solutions to encampment in Algeria that have been adopted or proposed and of the relevant protection concerns which may arise.

  • Protracted Sahrawi displacement: challenges and opportunities beyond encampment (Spanish)

    20 November 2013

    This RSC Policy Briefing analyses the challenges and opportunities – after 35 years of protracted displacement and encampment – for the Sahrawi refugees, their political representatives and international actors. The paper challenges assumptions and representations of conditions and dynamics in the camps. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh also calls for a careful analysis of the diverse alternative solutions to encampment in Algeria that have been adopted or proposed and of the relevant protection concerns which may arise.

  • They aren't all first cousins: Bedouin marriage and health policies in Lebanon

    20 November 2013

    Fertility and consanguineous marriages among the Bedouin tribes of the Middle East have long generated interest particularly around health outcomes and social relations. In particular, Bedouin in Lebanon have increasingly embraced the Lebanese national bio-medical health system in the past two decades, while Lebanese policy-makers' responses continue to be minimal and ill-informed. This paper investigates the mismatch between policy-makers' formulations of Bedouin consanguineous marriages and the Bedouins's actual reproductive practices and discusses the implications of these formulations on the Bedouins's access to health services.

  • IFRC World Disasters Report 2012

    20 November 2013

    Migration is a phenomenon that grows every year and affects in some way virtually every country. Many migrants move voluntarily – looking perhaps for economic opportunities, or for different lifestyles. But for others, migration is not a choice. More and more people are forced to flee their homes and communities because of many factors including conflicts, persecution, disasters and poverty. It is their plight that is the focus of the 2012 World Disasters Report.

  • Regime complexity and international organizations: UNHCR as a challenged institution

    20 November 2013

    The existing literature on regime complexity has generally focused on its impact on the behavior of states; in contrast, this article explores its implications for international organizations. Many organizations within the UN system were established in the aftermath of World War II, at a time when they held a de facto monopoly in a given policy field. Gradually, however, institutional proliferation has created a range of institutional overlaps that may have complementary or competitive relationships to the referent organization of the original regime. Developing the concept of challenged institutions, this article explores how international organizations are affected by and strategically respond to growing institutional competition. Through a case study of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees' response to an increasingly competitive institutional environment, it argues that the concept of challenged institutions highlights the dilemmas faced by multilateral organizations in a rapidly changing landscape of global governance.

  • Transforming global governance for the twenty-first century

    20 November 2013

    The rise of the global South is transforming global governance. It is creating new demands for multilateral institutions and jumpstarting regionalism. The result is a new range of strategic choices available to developing countries, and a new imperative to reform and reinvigorate multilateral and regional organizations. This paper explores the transformation of governance in four sectors—finance, health, migration and security—and highlights the implications for developing countries. In each area, developing countries have clear and powerful collective interests. There are also challenges for global governance. At one end is the relatively well-institutionalized area of finance, where reforming existing institutions is key. At the other end is migration, where global negotiations are needed, and institutions barely exist.