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  • Forced migration in the post-Cold War era: the need for a comprehensive approach

    17 December 2013

    Book description: The present international migration system is failing to respond to the new challenges and opportunities that movements of people now present. Rising levels of migration and its increasingly complex patternDSmarked by economic globalisation, a widening variety of source countries and unpredictable and intense flowsDSis making migration management more and more difficult. Fears have been expressed that a breakdown of the migration system, already under heavy strain, could spell political and economic disaster, creating in its wake a major setback in human progress. Not surprisingly, there have been calls in recent years for the establishment of a more robust and comprehensive multilateral framework to help revamp the present fragmentary and predominantly reactive arrangements. But little systematic work has been done to develop this idea. The study takes up this challenge. In this ground-breaking study, the issues and prospects of a multilateral response to the challenge of movements of people is explored. It presents, within a single, cohesive framework, the views, perceptions, and critical analyses of a group of eminent specialists drawn from different disciplines but with an in-depth knowledge of migration issues. It argues, that if a co-ordinated multilateral response is indeed necessary, what should be its exact configuration? In addressing this critical question, the book introduces the concept of an internationally harmonized migration regime, based on the principle of regulated openness - commonalty of policy objectives, harmonized normative principles and co-ordinated institutional arrangements.

  • Beyond Charity: International Cooperation and the Global Refugee Crisis

    17 December 2013

    With more than 18 million refugees worldwide, the refugee problem tops the agenda in intergovernmental meetings and has fostered an intense debate regarding what political changes are necessary in the international system to provide effective solutions in the 1990s and beyond. In the past, refugees have been perceived largely as a problem of international charity, but as the end of the Cold War triggers new refugee movements across the globe, governments are being forced to develop a more systematic approach to the refugee problem. Beyond Charity provides the first extensive overview of the world refugee crisis today, asserting that refugees are a political issue and must be dealt with as such. Gil Loescher argues persuasively that a central challenge in the post Cold-War era is to develop a comprehensive refugee policy that preserves the right of asylum while promoting greater political and diplomatic efforts to address the causes of flight. He presents the contemporary crisis in a historical framework and explores the changing role of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees. Loescher suggests short-term and long-term reforms that address both the current refugee crisis and its underlying causes. The book also details the ways governmental structures and international organizations could be strengthened to assume more effective assistance, protection, and political mediation functions. Beyond Charity clarifies the complex issues surrounding the global refugee crisis and offers directions for more effective approaches to refugee problems at present and in the future.

  • Refugees and the Asylum Dilemma in the West

    17 December 2013

    This study presents an examination of the historical background and contemporary significance of the asylum and refugee issue confronting Western governments that draws lessons for future policy-making. This is the first study of the asylum-refugee problems to examine not only the history of policies of receiving nations in the West but also some of the underlying causes of refugee movements. Past studies of the asylum problem have focused narrowly on the conditions in receiving countries and have failed to see the global interconnectedness of the refugee problem. The authors argue that resolving the asylum problem in the West requires policy makers to direct their attention toward the conditions outside the industrialized countries that cause mass movements of populations as well as toward the improvement of their own asylum procedures. The present increase in the number of asylum-seekers and refugees is neither a temporary phenomenon nor a random product of chance events. It is the predictable consequence of fundamental political, demographic, economic, and ecological crises occurring throughout the Third World and Eastern Europe. However, Western governments did not until relatively recently envisage a large-scale movement of the poor countries northward to Western Europe and North America. Actual migratory pressures from the South and perceived threats of exodus from the East have only served to reinforce a restrictive attitude toward asylum. The refugee problem has reached such a critical point that the very institution of asylum is being threatened. These articles address the underlying causes of the current crisis, assess present policies, and define the considerations necessary for future policy-making.

  • ECHR and the European Union (In: ECHR and Irish Law)

    18 December 2013

    Following the incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights Act 2003 into Irish Law, legal developments in areas such as criminal, family and immigration law have raised serious questions of compatibility with the ECHR. Developments in the European Court of Human Rights have highlighted the increasing potential for using the ECHR to positive effect in Irish law. This second edition of ECHR and Irish Law examines the impact of the ECHR on Irish law and considers the actual and potential contribution of the ECHR Act to domestic law in a range of areas. The work begins with research on the impact of the Act and an examination of the relationship between the ECHR, Irish law and EU law. There follows an examination of the effect of the ECHR on individual areas of Irish law, combined with analysis of ECHR law on these subjects. The book has been revised to include new and expanded chapters on: Civil Proceedings Prisoners' Rights Suspicious Deaths and Policing Immigration, Refugee and Asylum Law Criminal law. Written by a team of leading experts in their respective fields, ECHR and Irish Law provides an authoritative account of the incorporation of the ECHR and its impact on Irish Law in practice.

  • Gender InJustice: Towards the Feminisation of the Legal Professions?

    18 December 2013

    A comprehensive report on the rise of women in the legal professions in Ireland, and the implications for legal practice and the judiciary.

  • The Future of International Cooperation

    18 December 2013

    Reflecting our aspirations for the journal, the inaugural edition invites empirical and theoretical consideration on the future of international cooperation. In the aftermath of the divisions created by the invasion of Iraq and the questions raised about the future relevance of the United Nations, mapping the contours of inter-state collaboration and identifying the bases of global governance is crucial to the prospects for peace and security. Whether ‘coalitions of the willing’ or regional structures will supersede global responsibility-sharing, whether religious divides will polarise the West from the Islamic World, or whether the United Nations will adapt through initiatives such as the High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, are amongst the key questions that make ‘The Future of International Cooperation’ so germane for reflection and debate.

  • Human Security

    18 December 2013

    The concept of ‘human security’ represents a challenge to the Cold War assumption that ‘security’ should be understood in purely state-centric and militaristic terms. Rather, it recognises, firstly, that the ultimate referent object of security should be the individual, whose well-being is not necessarily coterminous with the security of the state. Secondly, it highlights that the sources of threat to individuals go far beyond inter-state conflict to include, for example, internal conflict, human rights abuses, communicable disease, environmental disasters, poverty and malnutrition.1

  • Editorial Introduction: The International Politics of Oil

    18 December 2013

    The papers [in this issue] are diverse and wide ranging, touching upon an array of seemingly unrelated themes from very different theoretical perspectives. Collectively, however, they highlight two things. Firstly, the range of approaches taken in this issue to analyse the international politics of oil highlights that the pursuit of sustainable and secure energy supplies is at the heart of world politics, intersecting with just about every significant contemporary global challenge. That a special edition on the international politics of oil can cover so much ground is an indication of how wide ranging the consequences of ongoing hydrocarbon dependence are and the challenges this presents for humanity. Secondly, and perhaps most significantly, it shows how much can be learnt about the changing nature of politics through the study of oil. Because oil represents a crucible for exploring the intersection of political economy, development, foreign policy, and international cooperation, it offers a starting point for asking more profound questions about the changing nature of contemporary world politics and how it should be conceptualised by academia. In that regard the papers in this special edition are as much about ‘international politics’ as they are about the ‘international politics of oil.’