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  • Administrative governance and the Europeanisation of asylum and immigration policy

    17 December 2013

    Book description: This book is a unique contribution to the understanding of the reality of government and governance in the European Union (EU). It illustrates the EU’s multi-level system and within it the activities of agenda setting, policy formulation and implementation which all involve co-operation between public administrations from the sub-national, national, supranational and international levels. The book portrays how co-operation amongst administrations in Europe has become the backbone of the EU’s unique system of government and governance. Many forms of co-operation have led to a truly integrated administration, which has developed in an evolutionary fashion and operates in large parts beyond the formally constituted rules of the treaties. EU Administrative Governance unites studies analysing policy phases and the most important policy areas from all three pillars of the EU. It outlines some of the main challenges which arise from the close integration of national and European administrations and explores implications for accountability and legitimacy of Europe’s increasingly integrated administration. This unique contribution to the contemporary understanding of structures underlying European government and the exercise of governance will be of great interest to scholars in the fields of administrative law, EU law and administrative sciences.

  • Gender equalities and the European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights (In: Economic and Social Rights under the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights)

    17 December 2013

    The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union includes,in addition to the traditional ‘civil and political rights’, a large number of rights of an economic or social nature. This collection of essays by leading scholars in this field considers the significance of the inclusion of such rights within the EU Charter, in terms of protection of individual and collective social and economic interests within and between the EU and its Member States. What differences might it make to EU law and policy (both in terms of its substance, and in terms of the processes by which it is formed), that certain economic and social rights are proclaimed in the EU Charter?

  • Rethinking the ‘refugee warrior’: the Karen National Union and refugee protection on the Thai–Burma border

    17 December 2013

    Well-founded fears that ‘refugee warriors’ will use refugee camps as a base for military operations, exploit a wider refugee population, or misuse international aid have led to the development of policies intended to ensure the separation of combatants and civilian refugee populations. However, a dogmatic approach to that policy goal may miss the true complexity of both refugee protection and the relationships between a refugee population and a military group. This article examines an alternative possibility, that a non-state armed group may be a potential partner in refugee protection and welfare promotion. It draws on the experiences of refugees from Burma living in camps in Thailand, where there has been a long-standing connection between camp governance structures and a political/military organization movement, the Karen National Union/Karen National Liberation Army. While camp governance activities have been flawed, they have also displayed a high level of integrity. It is argued that in such a situation, where there is a proven record of working to improve civilian welfare, international organizations might usefully explore possibilities of engagement with non-state armed groups as partners in refugee protection, with the specific goal of encouraging a more representative, accountable, and democratic approach to governance.

  • Bloody Sunday

    17 December 2013

  • Detention in the War on Terror

    17 December 2013

    Book description: Contemporary prison practice faces many challenges, is developing rapidly and is become increasingly professionalized, influenced by the new National Offender Management Service. As well as bringing an increased emphasis on skills and qualifications it has also introduced a new set of ideas and concepts into the established prisons and penal lexicon. At the same time courses on prisons and penology remain important components of criminology and criminal justice degree courses. This will be the essential source of reference for the increasing number of people studying in, working in prisons and working with prisoners.

  • Political imprisonment and the War on Terror

    17 December 2013

    Book description: This is the most comprehensive and ambitious book on prisons to have been published, a key text for anybody studying the subject and an essential work of reference for practitioners working in prisons and other parts of the criminal justice system. It is especially timely in view of the many changes and debates about the role of prisons and their future organisation and management as part of the National Offender Management Service. A key aim of the book is to explore a wide range of historical and contemporary issues relating to prisons, imprisonment and prison management, and to chart likely future trends. Chapters in the book are written by leading scholars in the field, and reflect the range and depth of prison research and scholarship.

  • Logging and legality: state crime theory meets green criminology

    17 December 2013

    Over the past decade, “crimes” against the environment have assumed, albeit falteringly, a new moral imperative. This article examines recent attempts to regulate, police, and criminalize one major environmental crime, the international trade in illicit timber, by contrasting local with global responses to the trade. The article examines issues of legality and sustainability; the role and sometimes problematic nature of civil society responses–domestic and transnational; and the impact of regulatory and state capture on the market. The focus of the article is an exploration of the interplay between the local and global in the context of a shifting moral and legal framework.