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  • Environmental Change and Displacement: Assessing the Evidence and Developing Norms for Response

    3 April 2014

    On the 8-9 January 2009 the Refugee Study Centre (RSC) and the International Migration Institute (IMI) of Oxford University convened a two-day workshop on Environmental Change and Displacement, with the support of the UNHCR. Attended by about 50 participants, the conference examined current research evidence on the relationship between climate/environmental change and migration, and the role the academic community should play in providing policy makers with guidance in forming policy in preparation for potential large-scale migration. The majority of participants were either academics or representatives from organisations engaged in research in the field of environmentally induced migration. Participants also included representatives from intergovernmental and international organisations and research students from various universities. The first day of the workshop focused on evidence and case studies as well as broader questions concerning the prediction of environmental migration and addressed methodological challenges. The second day moved on to consider legal and normative responses. The wide ranging discussion addressed many significant issues for future research and policy responses, yet clear answers were hard to reach.

  • Environmental change and forced migration: a state of the art review

    3 April 2014

    Interest in the link between environmental change and human migration has grown in the last five years, principally due to the mounting body of evidence on the likely impacts of anthropogenic climate change. This growing concern has led to widespread discussion of the potential for climate change to induce population movement. The drivers of such movement include the inundation of settled land due to sea-level rise, accelerated desertification among currently cultivated lands (leading to migration in search for food), and more frequent and severe climatic disasters such as drought, floods and tropical storms. This paper was prepared to compliment and develop earlier work of the Refugee Studies Centre on this subject (Boano, Zetter and Morris 2009) and to provide background analysis to the recent RSC Workshop on ‘Environmental Change and Displacement: Assessing the Evidence and Developing Norms for Response’ held from 8-9 January 2009. The aim of this paper is three-fold. Firstly, it seeks to outline the current debate on the relationship between environmental change and migration. Secondly, it outlines and interrogates the existing empirical data on the relationship between environmental change and migration. Finally, it highlights some existing gaps in the literature and considers methodological issues, making some suggestions for future exploration of the issue.

  • Protection through participation

    3 April 2014

    This paper is intended to provide background reading for the Cumberland Lodge Conference, “Voices Out of Conflict: Young People Affected by Forced Migration and Political Crisis.” It considers the situations of youth and adolescents affected by war and displacement throughout the world, and provides a summary of some of the key issues to be explored with regards to their protection. It draws upon insights and experience from researchers, practitioners and war-affected young people themselves in an attempt to better understand the challenges they face during war, and the resulting implications for policy and practice.

  • Mobile Peoples and Conservation: Crossing the Disciplinary Divide

    3 April 2014

    In April 2002, nearly 30 experts from around the world, with various professional backgrounds, attended a five-day conference in the Dana Nature Reserve, Jordan. They came together to address a difficult and sensitive issue, the relationship between mobile peoples and conservation. After intensive debate, in which contrasting perspectives were offered, common ground was successfully developed around an agreed statement – the Dana Declaration on Mobile Peoples and Conservation. This report gives a brief summary of the background to the meeting and the proceedings and introduces the Declaration. Annexed are the programme for the meeting , a list of participants and an action plan to carry forward the work.

  • Children and adolescents in Palestinian households: living with the effects of prolonged conflict and forced migration

    3 April 2014

    This study bridges the theoretical and applied divide which is common to much of the research directed at Palestinian children and adolescents in the Middle East. It integrates a research design with a practical agenda to improve delivery, policy and programmes and thereby help train practitioners to provide better services. Current policy and programming was taken into account in designing a participatory research methodology. This research approach, which crosses a number of disciplinary divides, has been a positive learning experience for the researchers, practitioners and sampled population of children, adolescents and caregivers. Its findings, partially provided below in a lessons learned report, should result in improved project, policy and programming delivery as well as a transferable good practice guide for refugee children and adolescents throughout the world.

  • Children and adolescents in Palestinian households: living with the effects of prolonged conflict and forced migration (Arabic)

    3 April 2014

    This study bridges the theoretical and applied divide which is common to much of the research directed at Palestinian children and adolescents in the Middle East. It integrates a research design with a practical agenda to improve delivery, policy and programmes and thereby help train practitioners to provide better services. Current policy and programming was taken into account in designing a participatory research methodology. This research approach, which crosses a number of disciplinary divides, has been a positive learning experience for the researchers, practitioners and sampled population of children, adolescents and caregivers. Its findings, partially provided below in a lessons learned report, should result in improved project, policy and programming delivery as well as a transferable good practice guide for refugee children and adolescents throughout the world.

  • Online connection for remittances

    27 January 2014

    Internet cafés in refugee camps allow refugees to maintain and create networks for overseas remittances. For the many displaced people who rely on receiving money from family members or friends overseas for their daily needs, maintaining these ties is vital. In the Buduburam refugee settlement in Ghana, use of the internet has played an important role in retaining and sometimes even forging transnational connections for financial remittances from Western countries. In the settlement there are a few internet cafés run by Liberian refugee entrepreneurs which enhance refugees’ access to remittances in two ways: firstly, by maintaining the refugees’ existing remittance channels with members of the diaspora community and, secondly, by creating new remittance pipelines by linking refugees with philanthropic individuals in the West.

  • Who receives remittances? A case study of the distributional impact on Liberian refugees in Ghana

    27 January 2014

    Significant advances in transportation and communication have helped substantially expand the recent flow of transnational migration. As a result, there has been rapidly growing interest in the impact of remittances on development, and on poverty reduction in particular (see de Haas 2005). But are poor households the main recipients of remittances? Little research has been devoted to the distributional impact of remittances. This Development Viewpoint reports relevant results from extensive fieldwork in a Liberian refugee settlement in Ghana. Though the sample is small and distinctive, the research findings suggest that rich, rather than poor, households could be the main beneficiaries of remittances.