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  • Engineered regionalism, forced migration, and the distribution of refugees

    13 December 2013

    Book description: Taking the context of forced migration, this book addresses the role that regional, in contrast to national or global, institutions and relationships play in shaping asylum policies and procedures. It examines the causes of forced migration movements; the direction of forced migration flows and its effect upon the immediate region; policy responses towards forced migration (in particular ASEAN and the European Community); cooperative arrangements and agreements between regional states; and the protection of human rights. The book also considers the role that regional responses are likely to play in determining the direction of asylum policy in receiving states and procedures in the future.

  • Who should be included? Non-citizens, conflict and the constitution of the citizenry

    13 December 2013

    Recognising the way that political systems’ failure to accommodate ethnic diversity can increase the likelihood of violent conflict, political scientists have in recent years expended much energy debating the character of appropriate political institutions for divided societies. However, a key limitation of these debates is that they have focused solely on the question of how best to represent an established (if often severely divided) citizenry (whether, for example, to represent citizens as members of ethnic groups, geographical regions, or as individuals). Consequently, the question of how the citizenry itself is constituted has largely been ignored. In this article, I aim to show why those who desire to avoid the tyranny of the ethnic majority – the dominance of one ethnic group over others – also have reason to concern themselves with the possibility of a tyranny of the citizenry – the illegitimate rule of the formal members of a society over those lacking in membership. I argue that how citizenship is distributed (who has access to it and who is excluded) in a society may be an important factor in explaining the existence of horizontal inequalities (understood as economic, social and political inequalities between groups in a society) and in their reproduction over time. The distribution of citizenship is thus likely to impact upon societal stability and the likelihood of conflict. Drawing in part upon empirical examples, I consider how people, both as individuals and as members of ethnic groups, become non-citizens and the factors that may force them to remain so over time in the country in which they reside. In Section 5, I explain why it is important for those interested in horizontal inequalities to consider how the issue of citizenship is distributed across a society and particularly across ethnic groups. In the final section of this paper, I reflect upon the vexed question of what it means to distribute citizenship fairly. Throughout this examination my focus is on formal, legal citizenship and the rights associated with it.

  • A thousand little Guantanamos: Western states and measures to prevent the arrival of refugees

    13 December 2013

    Book description: There are few issues more urgently in need of intelligent analysis both in the UK and elsewhere than those relating to displacement, asylum, and migration. In this volume, based on the 2004 Oxford Amnesty Lectures, major figures in philosophy, political science, law, psychoanalysis, sociology, and literature address the challenges that displacement, asylum, and migration pose to our notions of human rights. Each lecture is accompanied by a critical response from another leading thinker in the field.

  • Immigration and Asylum From 1900 to the Present

    13 December 2013

    Across a 20th century marked by world wars, regional conflicts, rising and collapsing empires, and the dawn of globalization, the flow of immigrants and asylum seekers reached unprecedented levels. And though America was by far the most popular destination, immigration (voluntary and otherwise) affected virtually every corner of the globe and continues in record numbers today. A comprehensive and timely examination of the history and current status of immigrants and refugees—their stories, the events that led to their movement, and the place of these movements in contemporary history and politics. Immigration and Asylum: From 1900 to the Present is an accessible and up-to-date introduction to the key concepts, terms, personalities, and real-world issues associated with the surge of immigration from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. It focuses on the United States, but is also the first encyclopedic work on the subject that reflects a truly global perspective. With contributions from the world's foremost authorities on the subject, Immigration and Asylum offers nearly 200 entries organized around four themes: immigration and asylum; the major migrating groups around the world; expulsions and other forced population movements; and the politics of migration. In addition to basic entries, the work includes in-depth essays on important trends, events, and current conditions. There is no better resource for exploring just how profoundly the voluntary and forced movement of asylum seekers and refugees has transformed the world—and what that transformation means to us today.

  • Asylum policy in the West: past trends, future possibilities

    13 December 2013

    Book description: This book examines the economic consequences of immigration and asylum migration. It focuses on the economic consequences of legal and illegal immigration as well as placing the study of immigration in a global context.

  • The Ethics and Politics of Asylum: Liberal Democracy and the Response to Refugees

    13 December 2013

    Asylum has become a highly charged political issue across developed countries over the last two decades. This book draws upon political and ethical theory and an examination of the experiences of the U.S., Germany, the U.K. and Australia to consider how to respond to the challenges of asylum. In addition to explaining why it has emerged as such a key political issue, the study provides a compelling account of how states could implement morally defensible responses to refugees.

  • Globalizing Rights: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1999

    13 December 2013

    This book, based on the prestigious Oxford Amnesty Lecture series, investigates the relationship between globalization and human rights. The contributors come to the subject from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, and include Noam Chomsky, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Homi Bhaba, Susan George, and Joseph Stiglitz, with introductions and commentaries by Richard Rorty, Alan Ryan, Charles Taylor and others. Their forthright and provocative essays challenge the view that the development of global markets and global investment, together with the widespread circulation of information on which this depends, make human rights abuses less likely.

  • Introduction: Globalizing rights

    13 December 2013

    Book description: This book, based on the prestigious Oxford Amnesty Lecture series, investigates the relationship between globalization and human rights. The contributors come to the subject from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, and include Noam Chomsky, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Homi Bhaba, Susan George, and Joseph Stiglitz, with introductions and commentaries by Richard Rorty, Alan Ryan, Charles Taylor and others. Their forthright and provocative essays challenge the view that the development of global markets and global investment, together with the widespread circulation of information on which this depends, make human rights abuses less likely.

  • Deportation and the liberal state: the forcible return of asylum seekers and unlawful migrants in Canada, Germany and the United Kingdom

    13 December 2013

    This article is based on interviews with government officials, UNHCR staff and members of the NGO community in Bonn (2 February 1999), Ottawa (5–8 December 2000), Berlin (2 February and 24 May 2001) and [with British officials] Oxford (3 May 2001). Earlier versions were presented at the International Studies Association’s Annual meeting, Chicago, 23 February 2001, at the Council of European Studies Biannual meeting, Chicago, 14 February 2002 and at the Catholic University of Brussels, Institute of Political Sociology and Methodology’s seminar series, Brussels, 11 April 2002. We are grateful to participants for comments. The research was assisted by a grant from the Canadian Department of International Affairs and International Trade in association with the Foundation for Canadian Studies in the UK.