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  • Atfal Filastiin wa Al-Hijra:Al-‘Aish fi Zull al-Hijra al-Qasriyyah fi Al-Sharq Al-Awsat (Children of Palestine)

    17 December 2013

    Palestinian children and young people living both within and outside of refugee camps in the Middle East are the focus of this book. For more than half a century these children and their caregivers have lived a temporary existence in the dramatic and politically volatile landscape that is the Middle East. These children have been captive to various sorts of stereotyping, both academic and popular. They have been objectified, much as their parents and grandparents, as passive victims without the benefit of international protection. And they have become the beneficiaries of numerous humanitarian aid packages which presume the primacy of the Western model of child development as well as the psycho-social approach to intervention. Giving voice to individual children, in the context of their households and their community, this book aims to move beyond the stereotypes and Western-based models to explore the impact that forced migration and prolonged conflict have had, and continue to have, on the lives of these refugee children.

  • Mobile peoples: pastoralists and herders at the beginning of the 21st Century

    17 December 2013

    Five books discussed here represent a broad sweep of studies on peoples who raise herds of domesticated animals and rely as much as possible on natural graze and browse. They are mainly mobile pastoralists rather than settled agriculturalists. Many of the world's pastoralists today find themselves in situations of marginality, economic impoverishment, and cultural vulnerability. The fundamental strength of these peoples is their adaptability, resilience, and resistance to unwanted transformations. Ideologies favoring either sedentary or mobile lifestyles, and not mere ecological constraints, have heavily influenced decisions leading to the current situation among mobile peoples.

  • Mobile peoples: pastoralists and herders at the beginning of the 21st Century

    17 December 2013

    Five books discussed here represent a broad sweep of studies on peoples who raise herds of domesticated animals and rely as much as possible on natural graze and browse. They are mainly mobile pastoralists rather than settled agriculturalists. Many of the world's pastoralists today find themselves in situations of marginality, economic impoverishment, and cultural vulnerability. The fundamental strength of these peoples is their adaptability, resilience, and resistance to unwanted transformations. Ideologies favoring either sedentary or mobile lifestyles, and not mere ecological constraints, have heavily influenced decisions leading to the current situation among mobile peoples.

  • Report on the Conference: Forced Migration and Dispossession in the Middle East

    17 December 2013

    An international conference was held on 28 and 29 February 2008 at the British Academy entitled: ‘Dispossession and displacement - Forced migration in the Middle East and Africa’. The event was organised by the Council for British Research in the Levant with the Refugees Studies Centre, University of Oxford, in collaboration with the British Institute in East Africa, the British Institute at Ankara, the British Institute of Persian Studies and the British School of Archaeology in Iraq. The conference was funded by a collaborative award from the British Academy’s Board for Sponsored Institutes and Societies (BASIS).

  • The Syria crisis, displacement and protection

    15 September 2014

    The 6.45 million displaced people inside Syria make this the largest IDP crisis in the world, with possibly also the largest number of people who are ‘trapped’. In addition, the number of refugees from Syria continues to increase. The international community has an opportunity to set up, from now, an effective response to what will clearly become protracted displacement. These 20 articles discuss how to increase protection for the displaced and how to shape assistance to both the displaced and their ‘hosts’.

  • Mobilising the Diaspora: How Refugees Challenge Authoritarianism

    16 November 2016

    Over half the world lives under authoritarian regimes. For these people, the opportunity to engage in politics moves outside the state's territory. Mobilising across borders, diasporas emerge to challenge such governments. This book offers an in-depth examination of the internal politics of transnational mobilisation. Studying Rwandan and Zimbabwean exiles, it exposes the power, interests, and unexpected agendas behind mobilisation, revealing the surprising and ambivalent role played by outsiders. Far from being passive victims waiting for humanitarian assistance, refugees engage actively in political struggle. From Rwandans resisting their repatriation, to Zimbabweans preventing arms shipments, political exiles have diverse aims and tactics. Conversely, the governments they face also deploy a range of transnational strategies, and those that purport to help them often do so with hidden agendas. This shifting political landscape reveals the centrality of transnationalism within global politics, the historical and political contingency of diasporas, and the precarious agency of refugees.

  • Understanding the challenge

    14 February 2014

    The likelihood that those in protracted exile may spend significant amounts of time either in camp-like situations or unprotected in urban settings often has negative implications for their human rights and livelihoods as well as for states’ security.